Are Woodpeckers Endangered? (Threats, Numbers + FAQs)

Are Woodpeckers Endangered? (Threats, Numbers + FAQs)

There are over 230 species in the Woodpecker family, including the closely related Sapsuckers, Flickers, Wrynecks, and Piculets. Increasing environmental awareness and a growing concern for the wildlife around us have brought the plight of threatened birds into the spotlight across the globe, and familiar species like Woodpeckers are no exception. But are Woodpeckers really in trouble? Are they endangered?

Most Woodpeckers are not currently endangered or at risk of extinction. However, some species have already been lost, and many are threatened by environmental problems like habitat loss. Bird populations are not static; even common species may suffer in years with food shortages or harsh winters.

There’s a lot more to learn about Woodpecker conservation. In this article, we’ll delve into the status of Woodpeckers, learn how a few selected species are faring in the modern world, and cover a few causes and possible solutions for their decline.

The Okinawa Woodpecker (pictured) is a critically endangered species

The Okinawa Woodpecker (pictured) is a critically endangered species

Case Studies of Some Woodpecker Species

Each Woodpecker species faces its own threats and challenges, which means their conservation status varies. A species may be common and secure in one country but highly threatened in another. In this section, we’ll look at a few Woodpecker species and their global conservation statuses on the IUCN Red List.

Critically Endangered Woodpeckers

Ivory-billed Woodpecker (Campephilus principalis)

One of the most famous Woodpecker species, their name sparks hope for some but sadness for most. This North American species is likely gone, driven to extinction by factors like habitat loss from logging and direct persecution for their feathers and meat.

Other critically endangered species:

  • Imperial Woodpecker (Campephilus imperialis)
  • Okinawa Woodpecker (Dendrocopos noguchii)

Endangered Woodpeckers

Fernandina’s Flicker (Colaptes fernandinae)

This Flicker is restricted to the island of Cuba, where widespread destruction of its palm savanna habitat and direct persecution are among the causes of its steep decline. Their population has been reduced to an estimated 600-800 individuals.

Other endangered species:

  • White-rumped Woodpecker (Meiglyptes tristis)
  • Yellow-faced Flameback (Chrysocolaptes xanthocephalus)
The Fernandina’s Flicker is endangered due to widespread destruction of its palm savanna habitat

The Fernandina’s Flicker is endangered due to widespread destruction of its palm savanna habitat

Vulnerable Woodpeckers

Great Slaty Woodpecker (Mulleripicus pulverulentus)

The Great Slaty Woodpecker is possibly the largest surviving Woodpecker species. These remarkable birds are in serious decline due to habitat loss in their Southeast Asian forest habitat. Their population is estimated at 26,000 to 550,000.

Other vulnerable species:

  • Helmeted Woodpecker (Celeus galeatus)
  • Sulu Pygmy Woodpecker (Picoides ramsayi)

Near Threatened Woodpeckers

Red-cockaded Woodpecker (Leuconotopicus borealis)

Despite their status on the IUCN Red List, Red-cockaded Woodpeckers are listed as an endangered species in the United States. These birds were formerly widespread in the American Southeast, although most of their original old-growth forest has been lost to timber harvesting and agriculture. They have an estimated population of 19,000 mature individuals.

Other Near Threatened species:

  • Ground Woodpecker (Geocolaptes olivaceaus)
  • Knysna Woodpecker (Campethera notata)
Pictured: The Great Slaty Woodpecker. This species is in great decline due to habitat loss

Pictured: The Great Slaty Woodpecker. This species is in great decline due to habitat loss

Least Concern Woodpeckers

Downy Woodpecker (Dryobates pubescens)

The Downy Woodpecker is an extremely widespread and numerous species in North America. They have adapted well to altered habitats like suburbia, and their population appears to be stable.

Lesser Spotted Woodpecker (Dryobates minor)

Europe and Asia are home to the Lesser Spotted Woodpecker, a species very similar in appearance to the Downy Woodpecker of North America. Despite their Least Concern status, Lesser Spotted Woodpeckers have declined significantly in the United Kingdom and other parts of Europe, highlighting the importance of finer-scale conservation assessments in many cases.

Great Spotted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos major)

In contrast with the previous species, Great Spotted Woodpeckers have increased significantly in the UK over the last half-century or so.

Other Least Concern species:

  • The great majority of the world’s Woodpecker species are listed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.
The Downy Woodpecker is an extremely widespread and numerous species in North America

The Downy Woodpecker is an extremely widespread and numerous species in North America

What Does it Mean for a Species to Be Endangered?

The term endangered is used in various ways, but technically, endangered species are those that are at great risk of becoming extinct in the wild.

The IUCN, or International Union for Conservation of Nature, publishes the global conservation status of the world’s plant and animal species. There are seven categories ranging from Least Concern to Extinct, and two more for species with unevaluated (‘Not Evaluated’) and unknown status (‘Data Deficient’).

IUCN Red List Categories

  • Data Deficient
  • Least Concern
  • Near Threatened
  • Vulnerable
  • Endangered
  • Critically Endangered
  • Extinct In The Wild
  • Extinct
  • Not Evaluated

At a finer scale, individual countries or states can define species as endangered. The Red-cockaded Woodpecker is an endangered species in the United States, while more locally, Gilded Flickers and Gila Woodpeckers are listed as endangered on the California Endangered Species Act.

The Gila Woodpecker is listed as endangered on the California Endangered Species Act

The Gila Woodpecker is listed as endangered on the California Endangered Species Act

Threats Facing Woodpeckers

Woodpeckers are vulnerable to many threats, ranging from natural phenomena like predation to human-caused industrial pollution. Let’s take a brief look at some of these threats:

Habitat Loss

The most serious threat to Woodpeckers is habitat loss through logging, land clearing for agriculture and industrial developments, poor fire management, and the introduction of invasive species. Species with specialized habitat needs and small ranges are particularly vulnerable to habitat loss.

Climate Change

Climate change has the potential to affect ecosystems all over the world by changing habitats and weather patterns. Its effects are of particular concern for the future of America’s endangered Red-cockaded Woodpecker.

Weather Events

Extreme weather events such as hurricanes and unusually cold winters can cause serious mortality in some years, and the habitat destruction they cause can have a long-lasting impact on birds like Woodpeckers.

Predation

Woodpeckers are naturally vulnerable to various predators during each stage of their life cycle. Carnivorous mammals, birds of prey, and snakes are all known to prey on these birds.

Woodpeckers have evolved alongside their predators, but they have limited defenses against introduced enemies. The Okinawa Woodpecker, for example, is threatened by predation from introduced mongooses and feral cats.

Pictured: Black Woodpecker. They can be found in mature forests across Europe and Asia

Pictured: Black Woodpecker. They can be found in mature forests across Europe and Asia

Conservation Efforts for Woodpeckers

It may be too late for iconic species like the Ivory-billed Woodpecker, but other threatened species don’t need to suffer the same fate. Fortunately, there are programs in place to bring some species back from the brink.

The Red-cockaded Woodpecker is a fine example of how focused conservation efforts can save species in trouble. Conservation authorities have successfully increased their numbers using the following actions:

  • Bolstering struggling populations by translocating individuals from areas where they are more numerous.
  • Managing their habitat with appropriate wildfire schedules.
  • Protecting their nest sites from other Woodpecker species.
The number of Red-cockaded Woodpecker species has successfully increased due to conservation efforts

The number of Red-cockaded Woodpecker species has successfully increased due to conservation efforts

How Can We Help?

Woodpeckers face so many serious threats that it's easy to feel hopeless to help them, but nothing could be further from the truth. Here are a few things you can do to help:

The easiest way to support the protection of Woodpeckers is to donate to under-resourced conservation bodies that are tasked with protecting Woodpecker habitats. Your time and efforts are just as valuable, of course, so roll up your sleeves and volunteer your services if you’re up to it.

Conservation doesn’t only happen in remote parks and reserves. Before the land was cleared to build your home, Woodpeckers probably inhabited your area, and there’s a good chance they still do!

Support local birds by planting native plants with high food and nesting value. With the involvement of just a few community members, your neighborhood could support thriving Woodpecker populations.

Pictured: Red-bellied Woodpecker. This species is easy to spot in the United States

Pictured: Red-bellied Woodpecker. This species is easy to spot in the United States

FAQs

How rare is it to see a Woodpecker?

While some Woodpecker species are scarce and restricted to specific habitats, many remain widespread and common. Species like the Downy Woodpecker and Red-bellied Woodpecker in the United States and the Great Spotted Woodpecker in the United Kingdom are easy to spot.

What country has the most Woodpeckers?

The tropics are home to the greatest diversity of Woodpecker species, with Southeast Asian countries like Myanmar and Thailand standing out among the richest. The United States has a similar Woodpecker species count, just over a much larger geographical area.

Why are Woodpeckers important?

Woodpeckers benefit natural ecosystems in many ways. Many other animals and birds rely on their nest chambers for breeding and sheltering, and their habit of feeding on wood-boring insects can keep pest insect populations in check.

Are Woodpeckers protected?

Woodpeckers are protected in the United Kingdom by the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 and in the United States of America by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918.

Is it illegal to kill a Woodpecker?

It is illegal to kill Woodpeckers in many parts of the world, including the United States and the United Kingdom. Damage-causing specimens may be controlled only under specific circumstances and with special permissions.

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