Types Of Hummingbirds In Georgia (Complete Guide)

Hummingbirds are one of the most interesting creatures you can find in your backyard or out in the wilderness. Georgia is a diverse landscape ranging from urban and suburban to coastline, swamps, and forests, all with rich plant coverage. While many of these hummingbirds are not native to Georgia, you can occasionally get a glimpse of them due to migration from the west in search of flower nectar. Although they are not native, it is important to understand, what hummingbirds can be found in Georgia?

Nine hummingbird species can be found in the state of Georgia. These include Allen’s Hummingbird, Anna’s Hummingbird, the Black-Chinned Hummingbird, the Broad-Billed Hummingbird, the Broad-Tailed Hummingbird, the Buff-Bellied Hummingbird, the Calliope Hummingbird, Rufous Hummingbird, and the Ruby-Throated Hummingbird. Many of these species migrate or breed in separate places and can be spotted at different times of the year.

To learn more about these nine species of Georgia hummingbirds, keep reading!

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The list of hummingbirds below has been compiled from historical sighting reports from various sources. Whilst some of the birds listed are uncommon and hard to spot, we've still included them as they are sometimes seen still in Georgia.

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird

Archilochus colubris

Ruby throated hummingbird

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird

Ruby throated hummingbird in flight

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird in flight

Ruby throated hummingbird on branch

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird perching on a branch

Ruby throated hummingbird on look out

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird on look out

Length:

7.5cm to 9cm

Wingspan:

8cm to 11cm

Weight:

3g to 3.5g

Seen :

All year round

Ruby-Throated Hummingbird

As one of the most common species in the United States, the Ruby-Throated hummingbird is the only bird that breeds east of the Mississippi River. That means this bird must fly non-stop over 500 miles over the Gulf of Mexico. This species prefers grasslands and forests to find its nectar and is on the smaller side.

The male can be identified by its scarlet gorget with a black chin strap. You can observe this bird in Georgia year-round.

Black-Chinned Hummingbird

Archilochus alexandri

Black chinned hummingbird

Black-Chinned Hummingbird

Black chinned hummingbird female

Female Black-Chinned Hummingbird

Black chinned hummingbird in flight

Black-Chinned Hummingbird in flight

Black chinned hummingbird perching

Black-Chinned Hummingbird perching on a thin branch

Length:

8cm to 9cm

Wingspan:

11cm

Weight:

3g to 3.5g

Seen :

October to April

Black-Chinned Hummingbird

Named in 1846 to honor Dr. Alexandre, its discoverer, the Black-Chinned hummingbird is found in most habitats including backyards around the United States. This species pumps its tail constantly while flying and derives nectar from a variety of sources.

This species is a small hummingbird featuring a grey crown and medium-to-long decurved bill. Its gorget is almost all black and small violet cues can be noticed in the correct lighting. The Black-Chinned hummingbird can be observed in Georgia between October and April.

Anna’s Hummingbird

Calypte anna

Anna hummingbird
Anna hummingbird close up

Close up of a Anna’s Hummingbird

Anna hummingbird female feeding young

Female Anna’s Hummingbird feeding her young

Juvenile anna hummingbird

Juvenile Anna’s Hummingbird

Length:

10cm to 11cm

Wingspan:

12cm

Weight:

4g to 4.5g

Seen :

Rare, but between November and March

Anna’s Hummingbird

With origins in California, Anna’s hummingbird is adaptable enough to expand its range eastward and northward to find exotic flowers in urban gardens and fields. Named after the Duchess of Rivoli, Anna Massena, Anna’s hummingbirds are known to eat sand, ashes, and insects in the winter.

You can identify this species by its medium size, with a straight black bill. Males feature a red gorget and both sexes hold their tails while hovering. Like Allen’s hummingbird, Anna’s hummingbird is rare in Georgia but could be found between November and March.

Calliope Hummingbird

Selasphorus calliope

Calliope hummingbird
Calliope hummingbird sitting on branch

Calliope Hummingbird sitting on a branch

Female calliope hummingbird hovering

Female Calliope Hummingbird hovering

Female calliope hummingbird

Female Calliope Hummingbird in flight

Length:

7cm to 10cm

Wingspan:

11cm

Weight:

2g to 3g

Seen :

Between September and April

Calliope Hummingbird

As the smallest breeding bird in the United States, the Calliope hummingbird weighs less than a penny. The species name is from the Greek word meaning “beautiful voice” which is ironic because this hummingbird has limited vocal capabilities. You can find the Calliope in older growth areas following fires and conifer forests searching for nectar from a variety of plants.

This species can be identified by its tiny size short tail, and short black bill. The male boasts a purple gorget over a contrasting white background. You can find the Calliope between September and April.

Rufous Hummingbird

Selasphorus rufus

Rufous hummingbird
Rufous hummingbird chirping

Rufous Hummingbird chirping

Juvenile rufous hummingbird

Juvenile Rufous Hummingbird

Rufous hummingbird in flight

Rufous Hummingbird in flight

Length:

9cm to 10cm

Wingspan:

11cm to 12cm

Weight:

3g to 4g

Seen :

Between August and April

Rufous Hummingbird

As the furthest breeder north than any other species in the United States, the Rufous hummingbird is an aggressive bird, so it is an unwelcomed guest at bird feeders. This bird can be found in forests and grassland between August and April.

The Rufous hummingbird can be identified by the male’s rufous gorget and its small size with a short black bill. Between the aggressive behavior and rufous plumage, you will easily be able to identify this bird as it fights its way to nectar and bird feeders.

Allen’s Hummingbird

Selasphorus sasin

Allens hummingbird
Allens hummingbird sitting in garden

Allen’s Hummingbird in sitting in back yard

Allens hummingbird sitting on spruce

Allen’s Hummingbird sitting on top of a spruce

Female allens hummingbird perched on a branch

Female Allen’s Hummingbird

Length:

9cm

Wingspan:

11cm

Weight:

2g to 4g

Seen :

Rare but between October and February

Allen’s Hummingbird

This guy may be small but is extremely territorial with a rufous tail, rump, and back, and a medium black bill. Named after Charles A. Allen, a Californian bird collector, Allen’s hummingbird has one of the most restricted breeding ranges in North American hummingbirds.

Despite having a habitat that has been altered by humans, you can find them zipping between feeders in urban and suburban environments. In nature, they feed on fuchsia-flowered gooseberry, bush-monkey flower, and honeysuckle found in fields and forests. They have little presence in Georgia but can sometimes be seen between October and February.

Broad-tailed Hummingbird

Selasphorus platycercus

Broad tailed hummingbird
Broad tailed hummingbird sitting on branch

Broad-tailed Hummingbird sitting on a twig

Female broad tailed hummingbird

Female Broad-tailed Hummingbird feeding

Female broad tailed hummingbirds

Two female Broad-tailed Hummingbirds

Length:

9cm

Wingspan:

13cm

Weight:

3g to 4g

Seen :

Uncommon, but between November and March

Broad-tailed Hummingbird

As a medium-sized hummingbird, the Broad-Tailed hummingbird features a call that resembles tiny bells ringing, which is a common sound during the winter. The female Broad-Tailed hummingbird is the oldest known wild hummingbird in the United States.

Like other hummingbirds on this list, the Broad-Tailed hummingbird feeds on nectar from several types of plants in fields, woodlands, and forests, and can be found in backyard feeders. You can identify the males by their hot pink gorget which is an extreme contrast from the white breast. It has a straight black bill and a long tail with a mild-mannered temper.

This hummingbird is uncommon in Georgia but can occasionally be seen between November and March.

Broad-billed Hummingbird

Cynanthus latirostris

Broad billed hummingbird
Broad billed hummingbird in the sun

Broad-billed Hummingbird enjoying the sun

Broad billed hummingbird perching on branch

Broad-billed Hummingbird perching on a branch

Female broad billed hummingbird feeding

Female Broad-billed Hummingbird feeding

Length:

8cm to 10cm

Wingspan:

13cm

Weight:

3g to 4g

Seen :

Uncommon, but between December and March

Broad-billed Hummingbird

The Broad-Billed hummingbird male features a striking red bill and sapphire throat that greatly distinguishes it from other hummingbirds. Females have a white line behind the eye, gray below, and are golden-green above. Although it is a frequent visitor to bird feeders, you can find this species anywhere native flowers are located, where it consumes nectar.

The Broad-Billed hummingbird also captures insects from plants and through fly catching. This species is small with a straight, long, notched tail. Male tales are fuller than females and boast round corners.

This bird is fairly uncommon in Georgia but can occasionally be observed between December and March.

Buff-bellied Hummingbird

Amazilia yucatanensis

Buff bellied hummingbird
Buff bellied hummingbird on branch

Buff-bellied Hummingbird resting

Buff bellied hummingbird testing the air with tongue

Buff-bellied Hummingbird testing the air with his tongue

Buff bellied hummingbird extracting sugar water

Buff-bellied Hummingbird extracting sugar water from feeder

Length:

10cm to 11cm

Wingspan:

14cm

Weight:

2.9g to 4.7g

Seen :

Uncommon, but between November and March

Buff-bellied Hummingbird

The Buff-Bellied hummingbird is different from other hummingbirds due to its large size and moderately long wings, tail, and bill. Adults feature a striking red bill with dark tip, rufous tail, iridescent blue-green breast and throat, buff belly, and rusty tail.

The Buff-Bellied hummingbird picks insects off vegetation, catches small flying insects, and drinks nectar. You can commonly find them in backyard feeders, where they chase away small hummingbirds. Also, they are located in bushland, forests, woodlands, and urban parks with flowering plants.

They are uncommon in Georgia but can sometimes be found between November and March.

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